Yag Laser

YAG LASER FOR CAPSULOTOMY AFTER CATARACT SURGERY(NIDEK, Japan)

The most common complication of adults having standard extracapsular surgery or phacoemulsification for cataracts is clouding of the part of the lens covering (capsule) that remains after surgery, called posterior capsule opacification. If the cloudiness affects your vision, you may choose to have a laser surgery called YAG posterior capsulotomy to correct this problem.

A laser (YAG laser) is used to cut a hole in the clouded back lining of the lens capsule to allow light to pass through the membrane to the retina at the back of the eye

What To Expect After Surgery

YAG laser posterior capsulotomy is an outpatient procedure. It does not require anesthesia, and it is painless. The person may wait in the outpatient surgery area or the doctor’s office for half to one hours after the procedure so that he or she can have the pressure in the eye (intraocular pressure) checked. Intraocular pressure (IOP) is the pressure caused by the fluid inside the eye that helps keep the shape of the eye.

Why It Is Done

After cataract surgery, some people notice cloudiness (sometimes called after cataract) after several months or years. In some people, it can become very dense and cause as much or more vision loss as the original cataract.

The decision to have this procedure is based on the same criteria as the decision to have the original cataract surgery:

  • Vision problems are affecting your work or lifestyle.
  • Glare caused by bright lights is a problem.
  • You cannot pass a vision test required for a driver’s license.
  • The difference in vision between your two eyes is significant.

The procedure is not needed unless vision loss caused by clouding of the lens capsule is seriously affecting the person’s vision and lifestyle.

How Well It Works

YAG laser posterior capsulotomy reduces glare and improves vision. It lets light pass through cloudy regions of the lens capsule that may develop after cataract surgery.

Risks

The most common complication of YAG laser posterior capsulotomy is short-term increased pressure inside the eye.

Other risks include:

  • Detachment of the nerve layer at the back of the eye (retinal detachment).
  • Swelling of the center of the retina (macular edema).
  • Damage or displacement of the intraocular lens.
  • Swelling of the clear covering of the eye (corneal edema).

What To Think About

It is common to have a new floater in the eye after this surgery.

YAG laser posterior capsulotomy is not used to prevent clouding of the back lining of the lens capsule (posterior capsule opacification). There is no way to know who will get clouding in the back of the eye after cataract surgery. Certain lenses used in the surgery to remove the cataract may lower this risk and the need for laser surgery later.

As with cataract surgery, it is important to weigh the risks and possible benefits of laser capsulotomy before deciding to have the surgery. About 1 out of 50 people who have laser capsulotomy after cataract surgery develop retinal detachment, which can cause serious vision loss.